Colors too dark, lost brightness, prints not sharp: What to do????

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    al escudero

    She means you have a couple of choices for the 'color space' that you use for your photos. For example, below I show the export screen for my Lightroom software. Note that I have the color space set to sRGB.

    9 times out of 10 when people get dark and muddy colors on their prints its because they have their images set to AdobeRGB instead of sRGB.

    When she refers to calibrating your monitor, she means you can use a small hardware device with a sensor that you can stick onto your monitor and run some software that will make your screen flash lots of colors. The sensor reads the colors, determines how far off the colors on your monitor are, and helps you to adjust them, and the brightness, etc. so that you see on your monitor is the way it should look.

     

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    Janie Bowthorpe

    Hi. I do see that you are saying that sRGB is the setting I want. I went into my Pixlr, the photo editing I use which is similar to photoshop, clicked on a color, which brings up a palette, then was ONLY able to click RGB. Is that enough??

    And by calibrating my monitor, are you referring to my computer monitor while I'm in Pixlr?? Or what is the small hardware device with sensor you are referring to? 

  • Avatar
    al escudero

    I'm not familiar with that software but it doesn't sound like the right setting. 

    With regards to color calibration, I mean a tool like this: https://www.adorama.com/icvs5p100a.html

     

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    Janie Bowthorpe

    Darn. I was really learning how to use Pixlr Editor, too. Don't understand why they don't have the sRGB setting and just RGB. Pixlr is very much like Photoshop. So if the RGB they allow me to select is not good, I've got to figure out what software I can use to edit my scans of my paintings and which has the sRGB. Makes me wonder if I'll need to pay for Photoshop! :( 

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    al escudero

    Try checking your camera's settings. You may have a setting in-camera to determine the color space you use for your images. It may be that your camera is set to adobe rgb and pixlr isn't actually changing your color space.

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    Janie Bowthorpe

    Hi Ale. For most of my artwork, I don't use a camera. I use my Epson V600 scanner. And I just did an internet search and found that in any Mode (Home, Office or Professional), the sRGB is embedded. That's good news. https://epson.com/faq/SPT_B11B198011~faq-148191

    But here's the deal...though my scan comes out pretty darn close to the colors I painted...and I then tweak a little with my Pixlr....it's only after sending my JPG file to Adoramapix that I get a print that's awful---colors darker, the loss of vibrancy in the colors, and a fuzziness (not the clear sharpness I got with the scan, and slightly enhanced with Pixlr.)  

    One thing I note in the ordering process is that APPLY CORRECTIONS is automatically set to YES. So I've turned that OFF. I'm shocked that an automatic correction would result in so many downgrades in the quality...if that's the cause.  So all I know to do is try ONE new print of one of my paintings which has a lot of bright color in it, pay the $5 for shipping for just one print, and pray I get a much better print from Adoramapix by turning that off.

     

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    al escudero

    Its unlikely that the apply corrections is the source of the issue. To clarify what that is - it means that one of our staff looks at your image on a color calibrated monitor, determines if the white balance, etc. appears to be off, and adjusts as needed. It isn't an automatic process, and one of our staff is unlikely to go out of their way to deliberately make your photos dark and drab. :) But, by all means you can try conducting a test - perhaps order two 8x10's of one of your images, one with corrections on and one off. That would be an inexpensive and quick way to see if there is a visible difference in your situation.

    One of the challenges we all face when we have uncalibrated monitors is that whatever tool we use - photoshop, lightroom, etc. we are adjusting our images to look good on our monitor. But if the colors on our monitor are substantially off, this will be reflected in our prints. I've operated with a dual monitor setup since the late 90's, and the problem can be seen very clearly when you take a photo and drag it so half of it is on one monitor and half is on the other. If they aren't calibrated you can clearly see the color differences between the two monitors. When I bought my new 2nd monitor - fresh out of the box it was considerably cooler (had a bluish cast) compared to my primary (calibrated) monitor. 

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    Janie Bowthorpe

    Ale, as I wait for my test print to arrive in which I turned off the Correction feature, I want to say that I do not have this problem with prints I get from a competitor of Adoramapix. From them, the colors have been the same brightness as I painted, as scanned and as tweaked with my Pixlr editing software. My avatar came from that competitor. The reason I use Adoramapix is because this competitor does not print the small sizes that you do. But your prints are as I described. And no, I'm not saying the problems are done deliberately. But something goes wrong between what I send you and what I get, which doesn't happen with the competitor. That's what I'm trying to figure out...

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